Jacks-Of-All-Trades Don’t Get Interviews Because…

Standard

As a career coach, I get a lot of emails that go something like this:

Dear J.T.,

I lost my job after working for more than ____ years at the same company. In that time, I had a variety of responsibilities. I worked in a half-dozen departments. As the company changed, I would take on new projects as needed. I was a “Jack-of-all-trades.”

I thought when I lost my job I’d find it easy to get a new one because of all I have done. I’ve got so many skills and abilities, my resume is three pages long. And yet, I can’t seem to get an interview. As I research positions on job boards, I find myself saying, “I can do that!” But, having applied to over 40 jobs, I’ve yet to get a single interview.

What am I doing wrong?

The answer is simple: When you try to look like a match for everything, you match nothing.

A Job Opening = Specific Problem To Solve

When a company has an open position, what they really have is a particular problem that needs to be solved. The person choose to hire will be the one that can solve the problem the best and is priced right. When you are marketing dozens of things about yourself, a/k/a being a Jack-of-all-trades, you overwhelm hiring managers. In fact, you distract them to the point they are unable to see you as a match. Not only do you appear overqualified, but they may also assume you are overpriced as well…resulting in your resume going in the “no” pile.(Here’s a good example of a Jack-of-all-trades who needed to revamp his LinkedIn profile in order to finally stand out to employers.)

The Solution? Become A “Swiss Army Knife” Instead

If you find yourself in the Jack-of-all-trades situation, I suggest you re-tool yourself to appear more like a Swiss Army Knife: be clear in what each of your key skills is good for and demonstrate them with precision. Here’s what to do:

Step 1: Identify the top 5 skill sets you want to leverage in your next position. You have many skills, but you need to focus hiring managers on the skills you are most passionate about using on a daily basis so you can find a job that plays to your strengths.

Step 2: Map out how those skills support an employer in solving a problem. Clarify how will you use these skills specifically to save and/or make the company money. Ask yourself, “What pain will I alleviate when I utilize these skills for an employer?”

Step 3: Quantify your track record of success in these key skills. You need to be able to back up your abilities with facts. Articulate examples of how you have used each of these skills to help an employer so you can justify the cost of hiring you.

Step 4: Optimize your career tools (i.e. resume & LinkedIn profile), so they reflect your problem solving expertise using the skill sets you chose to showcase. Simplify these documents so the text clearly supports your area of focus. Less is more. Give hiring managers enough information to confirm you can do the specific job without overwhelming them. Your career tools should say, “I can do the job you need, but you’ll need to contact me to learn more.” (Here’s an article where I explain why your resume has only 6 seconds to get a recruiter’s attention.)

Finally, Don’t Forget To…

Once you’ve gone from branding yourself as a generalist to a specialist, you need to do one more thing: start a proactive job search. Just because you revamped your professional identity to be better suited for specific jobs, doesn’t mean employers will start responding to your online applications. If you really want to get an employer’s attention, you need to increase your networking efforts so you can spread the word about your special problem solving abilities as a way to get referred into positions. (This article maps out why your resume is useless without the right networking strategy.)

What other tips can readers share to deal with the Jack-of-all-trades challenge? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

P.S. – First time reading my posts? Thanks for taking the time to stop by! Not only do I write for Linkedin, but I’m also founder of the career advice site, CAREEREALISM, and currently run the career coaching program, CareerHMO. I hope you’ll check them both out!

If you enjoyed reading this article, you may also like:

Top Job Interview Tips

Standard

Interview Skills – what really makes a difference?

It’s all pressure isn’t it? Not only do we live and work in a fast paced world, but we also have to be ever adaptable in the world of work, ever-ready to adjust that CV, explore and list our transferable skills, and so on. There’s so much good free information out there these days about how to structure your CV and application forms, that I suspect this has directly impacted on the increasing levels of post-interview disappointment that I am always reading about. Why? Because we’ve become so much better at the “getting the interview” part, that candidates are often failing to then “walk the walk” during the interview. I’ll cover this point in one of the tips.
So, what can be done to improve your chances at the next job interview? I have a number of practical tips for your tool kit. Which ones you adopt will be a matter of personal choice. I advocate all of them of course!

“6 of the best” Job Interview Tips:

• Be tuned in, switched on in advance: At least 30 minutes before you even enter the building, get “in the zone”, relax, breathe, tune in, and be absolutely on your game. Don’t leave it until you walk in the building to tune in.

• “Walk the walk”:
You have ticked all of the boxes in the JD, but do you have relevant and engaging stories for the panel that demonstrate that what you put down on paper lives and breathes for you. These anecdotes should be “locked and loaded” – ready to pull out of the bag as needed during the questions

• Rehearsals!:
This relates to the above point. I’d like you to dig a bit deeper, work a bit harder, at the whole rehearsing the potential answers you might give (to key questions which you will be able to anticipate, knowing the role’s requirements). They should be rehearsed aloud, not in your head. Get used to the sound of your voice, and it’ll pay dividends in terms of confidence and credibility.

• Better company research:
A no brainer? Perhaps, but again, candidates are getting smarter at this. You can download an annual report, get tuned into the company’s vision and objectives of course, but how about connecting with a few (non panel) employees via social networking, and finding out what the key issues are in the company?

• Post interview note:
You will no doubt in the past have followed up an interview with an email note thanking the interviews for their time, and briefly reiterating why you feel you’re right for the role. But how about a hand written, hand delivered card? This can be written out before hand, and left at reception as you leave (or if you’re walked right to the door, then pop back just after!). I’ve know this gesture work many times on a number of levels. The main one is, whether you get the job or not, you will be remembered for such a personalized way of saying thank you. If that idea doesn’t work for you, then a follow up email is a must.

• It’s a business meeting:
This is all about state of mind. If you truly view the interview as a business meeting, it will change the way you approach things slightly – you’ll feel a bit more like you’re sharing the “driving seat”, and I’ve known many cases where the candidate has been successful by adopting this mind-set.

The tips I’ve proposed are assuming you’ve got all the basics locked down; good body language, using their words in the interview, etc. Who’s to say which tips, from any source, are the definitive ones? What I always try to do is add that extra few % for my clients that will make the difference.

Stop Spending Time With Toxic People

Standard
English: A chocolate birthday cake

English: A chocolate birthday cake (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chocolate cake in ramekin - Yum :)

Chocolate cake in ramekin – Yum 🙂 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cover of "No B.S. Time Management for Ent...

Cover via Amazon

Stop Spending Time With Toxic People

In his book No B.S. Time Management for Entrepreneurs, business coach and consultant Dan Kennedy reveals the steps behind making the most of your frantic, time-pressured days so you can turn time into money. In this edited excerpt, the author explains the people you spend time with affect your productivity and why you should carefully choose who to associate with.

One of the most significant things you can control is association — your choices of who you permit into your world, who you give time to or invest time with, and who you look to for ideas, information and education. The people around you rarely have a neutral effect. They either facilitate your accomplishment, they undermine it, or they sabotage it outright.

The first useful association tactic is the elimination of toxic people and saboteurs. It’s not an easy thing to face facts about a friend, family member, long-time employee or long-time vendor when they are, in some way, interfering with or disapproving of your accomplishment. It’s important to face these facts and to act on them because the more time you spend with people who are unhelpful, unsupportive, disrespectful, envious, resentful, dysfunctional or outright damaging to you, the less value all your time has.

These people don’t just harm the minutes you and they are in the same place. Few people can so perfectly compartmentalize that they can lock every thought, assertion and act of a toxic person in a little mind box and without leakage into other mind boxes. Paraphrasing a Chinese proverb (I found in a fortune cookie), if you lie down with mongrel dogs, even for a short nap, you wake up with fleas — and they ride with you wherever you go.

Ideas, beliefs, opinions and habits work just like that. Even if you’re associating only occasionally or briefly with someone who is intellectually or emotionally toxic or someone who is feckless and inept, it’s enough time for the fleas to leap from them to you, burrow in and be carried away by you to subtly affect your performance and productivity. If your creativity or constructive thinking or work performance is thus diminished, so is the value of your time.

People who are detrimental for you to associate with are not necessarily of evil intent. They may all be “good people,” but that doesn’t mean they’re good for you. Good chocolate cake is not good for a diabetic. In fact, it’s poison. Associating with somebody who is always pushing it to you, saying “Just have a tiny piece” is just as suicidal as baking it for yourself.

There are lots of ways a person can be toxic and poisonous to you. I’ve had clients describe how recurring disputes with a particular employee were mentally exhausting but couldn’t be helped because otherwise, that person was a great asset. The “otherwise” is a big problem. Many small businesses wind up with a ruthlessly defensive key person who goes into murder mode anytime an attempt is made to add a second person but is “otherwise” terrific.

There’s the “we tried that before” guy. If it were up to him, we’d light the place with candles because Edison would have been limited to one try. There’s the “constructive critic,” always making you feel inadequate or undeserving, in the guise of being a cautionary ally worrying over you stubbing a toe.

On the other hand, constructive association with creative, inspiring, encouraging people can do a great deal to bolster your performance, thus making your time more valuable. Each minute of your time is made more or less valuable by the condition of your mind, and it is constantly being conditioned by association.

The entrepreneur is particularly susceptible to gaining or losing power by association because he has so many diverse responsibilities and is often operating under pressure, duress and urgency. Playing this game in a compromised mental state, weakened or wounded by poor ideas and attitudes seeded into the mind by association, is extremely difficult. Playing it strengthened and empowered by rich ideas and attitudes seeded into the mind by association can make the difficult easy.

Simply put, you want to deliberately reduce and restrict the amount of your time left vulnerable to random thought or association, and deliberately, sharply reduce the amount of time given to association with people who won’t make any productive contribution and may do harm. Does that mean you can only spend time with people you are in complete philosophical agreement with? No. In fact, such isolationism can be dangerous. But it does mean you should avoid association with people who believe and promulgate beliefs diametrically opposed to “success orientation.”

You want to deliberately increase the amount of your time directed at chosen thinking and input, and constructive, productive association. You want to associate with strivers and achievers, with winners and champions. This is an uplifting force that translates into peak performance, which makes all your time more valuable.

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/230270?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+entrepreneur%2Flatest+%28Entrepreneur%29#ixzz2okOC66Pu

9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Interview Question

Standard
English: Washington, DC, August 29, 2006 - Gle...

English: Washington, DC, August 29, 2006 – Glenn Cannon, FEMA’s Director of Response answers an interview question for a reporter at the FEMA Video Studio. FEMA/Bill Koplitz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

tony hsieh, ceo, zappos.com

tony hsieh, ceo, zappos.com (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Image representing David Gilboa as depicted in...

Image by None via CrunchBase

Image representing YouTube as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Interview Question

Getty Images/Ethan Miller

Tony Hsieh

If you could ask job candidates only one question, what would be most telling?

As it turns out, many CEOs have one go-to interview question that they believe reveals everything they need to know about a candidate. Some swear by serious questions about a candidate’s best accomplishment. Others believe that silly queries about holiday costumes and the zombie apocalypse best reveal a candidate’s creativity.

From Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh to Warby Parker CEO David Gilboa, we’ve collected top interview questions from the following nine company leaders.

On a scale of one to 10, how weird are you?

On a scale of one to 10, how weird are you?

REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos

One of Zappos’ core values is to “create fun and a little weirdness,” Tony Hsieh, CEO of the company, tells Business Insider.

To make sure he hires candidates with the right fit, Hsieh typically asks the question: “On a scale of one to 10, how weird are you?” He says the number isn’t too important, but it’s more about how people answer the question. Nonetheless, if “you’re a one, you probably are a little bit too straight-laced for the Zappos culture,” he says. “If you’re a 10, you might be too psychotic for us.”

Another question Zappos usually asks candidates is: “On a scale of one to 10, how lucky are you in life?” Again, the number doesn’t matter too much, but if you’re a one, you don’t know why bad things happen to you (and probably blame others a lot). And if you’re a 10, you don’t understand why good things always seem to happen to you (and probably lack confidence).

Tell me about the time you realized you had the power to do something meaningful.

Tell me about the time you realized you had the power to do something meaningful.

InternetNews via YouTube

Simon Anderson, CEO of DreamHost

Simon Anderson, CEO of DreamHost, a web hosting provider and domain name registrar, says he asks one question to determine what motivates candidates: “Tell me about the first experience in your life when you realized that you had the power of change or the power to do something meaningful.”

“It’s open-ended. Some people might tell the story of when they were five and there was some incident and they had to take more responsibility for their baby brother or sister,” he tells The New York Times. “Maybe it was from their teenage years: ‘Something bad was going to happen at school and I stood up for this friend of mine and all of a sudden I felt self-empowered to do things.’ I think that’s really important. If someone sits there and they’re stumped, I think that tells you something.”

How would you describe yourself in one word?

How would you describe yourself in one word?

YWCA

Dara Richardson-Heron, CEO of YWCA

The best candidates are the ones who know exactly who they are. That’s why Dara Richardson-Heron, CEO of women’s organization YWCA, always asks her candidates this question.

Richardson-Heron says she doesn’t judge people on the word they choose, but it does give her insight into how people package themselves. She tells Adam Bryant at The New York Times that she likes when people take time to ponder the question and answer thoughtfully.

What would you do in the event of a zombie apocalypse?

What would you do in the event of a zombie apocalypse?

Screenshot from YouTube

Ashely Morris, CEO of Capriotti’s

This seems like a ridiculous question to ask, but it’s posed to every prospective employee at Capriotti’s Sandwich Shop, a national restaurant franchise. Ashley Morris, the company’s CEO, says it’s the best way to learn how candidates react under pressure.

“There really is no right answer, so it’s interesting to get someone’s opinion and understand how they think on their feet,” Morris explains. “The hope is that for us, we’re going to find out who this person is on the inside and what’s really important to him, what his morals really are, and if he’ll fit on the cultural level.”

Tell me about the last person you fired.

Tell me about the last person you fired.

Courtesy of Marc Barros

Marc Barros, CEO of Contour

Marc Barros, cofounder and former CEO of camera company Contour, swears by this question. “Of all the ways I interviewed executive candidates, this question and the discussion that followed proved to be the strongest indicator of the candidate’s leadership ability,” he tells Inc.

Barros believes a candidate who claims to have never fired anyone is clearly a bad choice. “You can’t build a great team without occasionally deconstructing and rebuilding it,” he argues.

If the candidate has fired someone, then he focuses on how the process went, which reveals a great deal about their communication skills. Did they offer feedback to the person and explain their reasoning for the decision? Barros says great leaders are like coaches, constantly giving feedback.

Tell me about your failures.

Tell me about your failures.

Museum of Chinese in America

Jenny Ming, CEO of Charlotte Russe

A good answer to this question is important because it means that the candidate isn’t afraid of taking risks and will admit when things don’t work out, says Jenny Ming, president and CEO of clothing store Charlotte Russe.

“It doesn’t even have to be business; it could be life lessons. I think it’s pretty telling. What did they do afterward?” she says. “How did they overcome that? I always look for somebody who’s very comfortable admitting when something didn’t work out.”

People always like to tell you about their successes, she explains, but they don’t always want to tell you what didn’t work out so well for them.

What was the last costume you wore?

What was the last costume you wore?

Colin Hughes/Courtesy Warby Parker

Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal, CEOs of Warby Parker

It doesn’t matter so much what they wore, but why they wore it. If the candidate’s reasoning matches Warby Parker’s core value of injecting “fun and quirkiness into work, life, and everything [they] do,” they might have a real shot at getting a job there.

“We find that people who are able to make the job environment fun build followership more easily,” the company’s cofounder and co-CEO David Gilboa tells Iris Mansour at Quartz. “If we hire the most technically skilled person in the world whose work style doesn’t fit here, they won’t be successful.”

Tell me about your crowning achievement.

Tell me about your crowning achievement.

Courtesy of The Adler Group

Lou Adler, CEO of The Adler Group

Lou Adler, CEO of hiring services company The Adler Group, says he always asks candidates to talk about their crowning achievement or most significant accomplishment. That question not only tells you what energizes the applicant, but also helps you figure out if their interests and passions align with yours.

“The idea is that if you understand someone’s most significant accomplishment or crowning achievement, and really are willing to spend 20 minutes understanding it, then you know what motivates the person,” Adler tells Business Insider.

Tell me about your last project. Who was involved and what was the biggest challenge?

Tell me about your last project. Who was involved and what was the biggest challenge?

ijeggers via YouTube

Jana Eggers, CEO of Spreadshirt

To get a sense of how people work, Jana Eggers, former CEO of personalized clothing company Spreadshirt, likes to ask candidates about projects they’ve worked on.

“I’m interested in seeing how they organized themselves, how they think about projects, how they think about other people around them,” Eggers tells The New York Times. “There are very few jobs in any company these days where one person goes in and does it alone. They always have to interact with other people.”

BONUS: Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem.

BONUS: Give me an example of a time when you solved an analytically difficult problem.

Commonwealth Club via YouTube

Laszlo Bock, SVP of people operations at Google

Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations at Google, says the company ditched its famous brainteaser interview questions in recent years for behavioral ones.

“The interesting thing about the behavioral interview is that when you ask somebody to speak to their own experience, and you drill into that, you get two kinds of information,” Bock tells The New York Times. “One is you get to see how they actually interacted in a real-world situation, and the valuable ‘meta’ information you get about the candidate is a sense of what they consider to be difficult.”

More:

 

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ceo-interview-questions-2013-12?op=1#ixzz2oAKAONJd

Top Job Bloggers’ Most Popular Articles of 2013

Standard
English: Labor Force Statistics from the Curre...

English: Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

LinkedinAnswers

LinkedinAnswers (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

linkedin

linkedin (Photo credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

Top Job Bloggers’ Most Popular Articles of 2013

Compelation by Stephen Darori and Stephen Drus

Heather Huhman Heather R. Huhman11 More Things They Don’t Tell You About Your First Internship
lavie margolin Lavie Margolin14 Do’s & Don’ts for LinkedIn “Skills & Expertise” profile category
Meg Guiseppi Meg GuiseppiSocial Proof: Where Online Presence Meets Personal Branding
dorleem avatar Dorlee MHow to Tame Your Job Interview Anxiety Once And For All !
Sital Ruparelia Sital Ruparelia5 Networking Myths
Alison Green Alison Greenwhen should salary be discussed in a hiring process? (part 2)
Gayle Howard Gayle HowardThe Traditional Cover Letter. Is it Outdated?
andy headworth Andy Headworth: So where are the 10 hottest job markets going to be in 2020?
Career Alley Joey Trebif: Top 6 Questions Asked for Embedded Engineers During an Interview
Julie Walraven Julie Walraven: Top 5 Major LinkedIn mistakes to avoid in 2013
Lindsey Pollak Lindsey Pollak: Millennials at Work: Gen Ys and Ambition
Suzanne Lucas Suzanne Lucas: Want Happier Employees? Feed Them
Karalyn Brown Karalyn Brown: 88 Great Behavioural Interview Questions To Help You Prepare For Your Next Interview!
Sharlyn Lauby Sharlyn Lauby: How To: Follow Up After a Job Interview
Dana Leavy-Detrick Dana Leavy-Detrick: How to Follow Up After the Interview or Application
alexandra levit Alexandra Levit: 8 Bad Mistakes New Managers Make
Jim Stroud Jim Stroud: This is why your resume was rejected
Rich DeMatteo Rich DeMatteo: 5 Things Recruiters Hate About Job Seekers
Dan Schawbel Dan Schawbel: Beware The ‘Tell Me About Yourself’ Job Interview Question!
jennifer mcclure Jennifer McClure: 10 Action Steps to Get the Most Out of LinkedIn [Beyond the Basics]
Andrew Rosen Andrew Rosen: 8 Best Employee Incentive Programs
anita bruzzese Anita Bruzzese: The No. 1 Reason Employers Can’t Find the Right Talent
Cindy Kraft Cindy Kraft: The 5 Worst Things You Can Do in Your Career
Jon Ingham Jon Ingham: Qinetiqette qits – can it be true?
Penelope  Trunk Penelope Trunk: The pursuit of happiness makes life shallow
Recruiting Animal Recruiting Animal: Revisiting Job Hunters – Jul 17, 2013
Eve Tahmincioglu Eve Tahmincioglu: Women, Work, War: A Guide to Toppling “The Company Man” Model
Hannah Morgan Hannah Morgan: 41 Reasons Why You Didn’t Get the Job
Jenny Foss Jenny Foss: Two different shoes don’t matter. Getting the important stuff right does.
Dan McCarthy Dan McCarthy: How to Confront an Employee Performance Problem
Erin Kennedy Erin Kennedy: Unemployed? You Have Secret Powers!
Phyllis Mufson Phyllis Mufson: Goal Setting: Part 2 of Your Personal/Professional Success Plan
Joshua Waldman Joshua Waldman: Part 1: Why You Should Use LinkedIn — Like Your Career Depends on It
Barbara Safani Barbara Safani: 10 Items That Should be Removed From Your Resume Pronto!
Mark Stelzner Mark Stelzner: The Power Of Seven Simple Questions
Jessica Merrell Jessica Merrell: 12 Best & Most Ridiculous Employer Brand & Recruiting Videos
Jason Alba Jason Alba: Never again say: “I lost my job.” Instead, say this:
Mark Babbitt Mark Babbitt: “Follow Your Passion” SUCKS as Career Advice
Susan Joyce Susan Joyce: After the Job Interview – Keep Searching and Keep Interviewing
Donna Sweidan Donna SweidanWhat Is Career Coaching And How Can It Help You?
Susan LaMotte Susan LaMotte5 Reasons Recruiting Is Like Dating
Grace Kutney Grace KutneyQuick Tips: Preparing for Skype or Phone Interviews
Miriam Salpeter Miriam SalpeterNetworking tips: how to expand your network
175 Helpful Questions To Ask At A Job Interview

 

 

Stephen Darori is the managing Partner of 3XC Global Partners. He is the Lead  Principal of Darori Capital Luxembourg. Stephen has been the Chairman of the Darori Foundation since 1982.

 

The Darori Foundation is the largest  donor of books to Israeli ( and also South African) University, College and Muncipal libraries and has consistently been so since 1969. The Darori Foundation , given the decreasing demand for hard copy books in the 21st Century Digital age , now leads and participates in Projects to put Internet Devices in Every Child in Israel. In 2013 , $5 million was earmarked to upgrade the notebooks used in schools in the Southern Periphery  Towns within 20 kms of Gaza . IBM (Corp)  quietly committed them selves to  matching finance ( in kind) . The new IBM notebooks are purchased at almost cost to IBM ( substantially discounted ) . Lets not start a turf war in Zion between IBM Israel ( franchised sales rep and IBM Corp )  . Keep the later sentence as confidentiality as possible. Over and above Notebooks and other Internet Devices , free ISP services  are provided and have been upgraded to a 100 Mega Down-link.

 

Stephen is also the founder of the Start Up Nation Critical Canvas. This is a  Socio Economical Political Lobby to change the employment Laws in Israel and open up the Job Market  to High Tech People who are not Jewish or Israeli. the pitch is simple . Israeli Academia can now longer keep pace with the Demand of the Start Up Nation’s White Silicon City ‘s Silicon Boulevard, the Golden Silicon City and the Silicon Wadi’s demand for High Tech Headcount. This is an extremely difficult Pitch to deliver as all decision makers wear two or more different Caps . The pitch says let them work in Zion, pay taxes , enjoy all the benefits of an Israeli Tax Payer but never Israeli Citizenship unless they marry an Israeli. The Tax System for individuals in Israel is structures around an Israeli ID Number. No ID number , no opportunity to work in Israel . Medical associations have a boutique solution for non-Israelis living in Zion who require medical treatment

Personal branding

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Personal branding is the practice of people marketing themselves and their careers as brands.[1] While previous self-helpmanagement techniques were about self-improvement, the personal-branding concept suggests instead that success comes from self-packaging.[1] Personal branding also involves creating an asset by defining an individual’s bodyclothingphysical appearance,digital and online presence and areas of knowledge in a way leading to a uniquely distinguishable, and ideally memorable, impression.[citation needed] The term is thought to have been first used and discussed in a 1997 article by Tom Peters.[2]

Personal Branding is esentially; the ongoing process of establishing a prescribed image or impression in the mind of others about an individual, group or organization.[3] Personal branding can often involves the application of one’s name to various products. For example, the celebrity real-estate mogul Donald Trump uses his last name extensively on his buildings and on the products he endorses (e.g. Trump Steaks).

History[edit]

Personal branding, self-positioning and all individual branding by whatever name, was first introduced in 1937 in the book Think and Grow Rich[citation needed] by Napoleon Hill. The idea surfaced later in the 1981 book Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind, by Al Riesand Jack Trout.[4] More specifically in “Chapter 23. Positioning Yourself and Your Career – You can benefit by using positioning strategy to advance your own career. Key principle: Don’t try to do everything yourself. Find a horse to ride”.

It was later popularized by Tom Peters.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up to:a b Lair, Daniel J.; Sullivan, Katie; Cheney, George (2005). “Marketization and the Recasting of the Professional Self”Management Communication Quarterly 18 (3): 307–343. doi:10.1177/0893318904270744.
  2. Jump up^ Asacker, Tom (10 March 2004). “The Seven Wonders of Branding”Forbes.com. Retrieved June 14, 2013.
  3. Jump up^ Creating Your Personal Brand – Los Ellis 2009
  4. Jump up^ Ries, Al; Trout, Jack (1981). Positioning: The Battle for your Mind. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07-135916-0.

 

10 Overused Words You Should Never Put On Your Resume

Standard
LinkedIn MerlinWizard

LinkedIn MerlinWizard (Photo credit: Adriano Gasparri)

LinkedIn Maps

LinkedIn Maps (Photo credit: Matthew Burpee)

English: The LIONs™ Logo / Badge

English: The LIONs™ Logo / Badge (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isaac Newton's personal copy of the first edit...

Isaac Newton’s personal copy of the first edition of his Principia Mathematica, bearing Pepys’s name (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My LinkedIn network, visualized

My LinkedIn network, visualized (Photo credit: For Inspiration Only)

linkedin

linkedin (Photo credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

This UML diagram describes the domain of Linke...

This UML diagram describes the domain of LinkedIn social networking system. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

10 Overused Words You Should Never Put On Your Resume

DEC. 11, 2013, 10:37 AM 36,338 8

  • inShare165
  •  EMAIL
  •  MORE

 

Are you responsible? A strategic planner and creative thinker?

 

So is the rest of the career-seeking world, according to LinkedIn’s annual list of the year’s most overused resume words. “Responsible” was the worst offender in 2013, followed by “strategic” and “creative.”

To compile its fourth annual list, LinkedIn examined the online profiles and resumes of its more than 259 million members. In the two previous years, “creative” led the rankings.

Here is LinkedIn’s full list of overused resume words:

  1. Responsible
  2. Strategic
  3. Creative
  4. Effective
  5. Patient
  6. Expert
  7. Organizational
  8. Driven
  9. Innovative
  10. Analytical

Nicole Williams, the official career expert of LinkedIn, says the list is a reminder of how it’s always better to show rather than tell when selling yourself on a resume. “Providing concrete examples to demonstrate how you are responsible or strategic is always better than just simply using the words,” she explains.

While there’s nothing wrong with being responsible, strategic, or creative, the danger in marketing yourself with those terms is that you’ll blend in with the job pool.

“If you sound like everyone else, you won’t stand out from other professionals vying for opportunities,” Williams says. “Differentiate yourself by uniquely describing what you have accomplished in your career and back it up with concrete examples of your work.”

Check out an infographic on the data below:

 

LinkedIn 2013 resume words overused infographic

LinkedIn

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/overused-resume-words-2013-12#ixzz2nDyLDsiw