Top Job Interview Tips

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Interview Skills – what really makes a difference?

It’s all pressure isn’t it? Not only do we live and work in a fast paced world, but we also have to be ever adaptable in the world of work, ever-ready to adjust that CV, explore and list our transferable skills, and so on. There’s so much good free information out there these days about how to structure your CV and application forms, that I suspect this has directly impacted on the increasing levels of post-interview disappointment that I am always reading about. Why? Because we’ve become so much better at the “getting the interview” part, that candidates are often failing to then “walk the walk” during the interview. I’ll cover this point in one of the tips.
So, what can be done to improve your chances at the next job interview? I have a number of practical tips for your tool kit. Which ones you adopt will be a matter of personal choice. I advocate all of them of course!

“6 of the best” Job Interview Tips:

• Be tuned in, switched on in advance: At least 30 minutes before you even enter the building, get “in the zone”, relax, breathe, tune in, and be absolutely on your game. Don’t leave it until you walk in the building to tune in.

• “Walk the walk”:
You have ticked all of the boxes in the JD, but do you have relevant and engaging stories for the panel that demonstrate that what you put down on paper lives and breathes for you. These anecdotes should be “locked and loaded” – ready to pull out of the bag as needed during the questions

• Rehearsals!:
This relates to the above point. I’d like you to dig a bit deeper, work a bit harder, at the whole rehearsing the potential answers you might give (to key questions which you will be able to anticipate, knowing the role’s requirements). They should be rehearsed aloud, not in your head. Get used to the sound of your voice, and it’ll pay dividends in terms of confidence and credibility.

• Better company research:
A no brainer? Perhaps, but again, candidates are getting smarter at this. You can download an annual report, get tuned into the company’s vision and objectives of course, but how about connecting with a few (non panel) employees via social networking, and finding out what the key issues are in the company?

• Post interview note:
You will no doubt in the past have followed up an interview with an email note thanking the interviews for their time, and briefly reiterating why you feel you’re right for the role. But how about a hand written, hand delivered card? This can be written out before hand, and left at reception as you leave (or if you’re walked right to the door, then pop back just after!). I’ve know this gesture work many times on a number of levels. The main one is, whether you get the job or not, you will be remembered for such a personalized way of saying thank you. If that idea doesn’t work for you, then a follow up email is a must.

• It’s a business meeting:
This is all about state of mind. If you truly view the interview as a business meeting, it will change the way you approach things slightly – you’ll feel a bit more like you’re sharing the “driving seat”, and I’ve known many cases where the candidate has been successful by adopting this mind-set.

The tips I’ve proposed are assuming you’ve got all the basics locked down; good body language, using their words in the interview, etc. Who’s to say which tips, from any source, are the definitive ones? What I always try to do is add that extra few % for my clients that will make the difference.

10 Overused Words You Should Never Put On Your Resume

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10 Overused Words You Should Never Put On Your Resume

DEC. 11, 2013, 10:37 AM 36,338 8

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Are you responsible? A strategic planner and creative thinker?

 

So is the rest of the career-seeking world, according to LinkedIn’s annual list of the year’s most overused resume words. “Responsible” was the worst offender in 2013, followed by “strategic” and “creative.”

To compile its fourth annual list, LinkedIn examined the online profiles and resumes of its more than 259 million members. In the two previous years, “creative” led the rankings.

Here is LinkedIn’s full list of overused resume words:

  1. Responsible
  2. Strategic
  3. Creative
  4. Effective
  5. Patient
  6. Expert
  7. Organizational
  8. Driven
  9. Innovative
  10. Analytical

Nicole Williams, the official career expert of LinkedIn, says the list is a reminder of how it’s always better to show rather than tell when selling yourself on a resume. “Providing concrete examples to demonstrate how you are responsible or strategic is always better than just simply using the words,” she explains.

While there’s nothing wrong with being responsible, strategic, or creative, the danger in marketing yourself with those terms is that you’ll blend in with the job pool.

“If you sound like everyone else, you won’t stand out from other professionals vying for opportunities,” Williams says. “Differentiate yourself by uniquely describing what you have accomplished in your career and back it up with concrete examples of your work.”

Check out an infographic on the data below:

 

LinkedIn 2013 resume words overused infographic

LinkedIn

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/overused-resume-words-2013-12#ixzz2nDyLDsiw