Jacks-Of-All-Trades Don’t Get Interviews Because…

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As a career coach, I get a lot of emails that go something like this:

Dear J.T.,

I lost my job after working for more than ____ years at the same company. In that time, I had a variety of responsibilities. I worked in a half-dozen departments. As the company changed, I would take on new projects as needed. I was a “Jack-of-all-trades.”

I thought when I lost my job I’d find it easy to get a new one because of all I have done. I’ve got so many skills and abilities, my resume is three pages long. And yet, I can’t seem to get an interview. As I research positions on job boards, I find myself saying, “I can do that!” But, having applied to over 40 jobs, I’ve yet to get a single interview.

What am I doing wrong?

The answer is simple: When you try to look like a match for everything, you match nothing.

A Job Opening = Specific Problem To Solve

When a company has an open position, what they really have is a particular problem that needs to be solved. The person choose to hire will be the one that can solve the problem the best and is priced right. When you are marketing dozens of things about yourself, a/k/a being a Jack-of-all-trades, you overwhelm hiring managers. In fact, you distract them to the point they are unable to see you as a match. Not only do you appear overqualified, but they may also assume you are overpriced as well…resulting in your resume going in the “no” pile.(Here’s a good example of a Jack-of-all-trades who needed to revamp his LinkedIn profile in order to finally stand out to employers.)

The Solution? Become A “Swiss Army Knife” Instead

If you find yourself in the Jack-of-all-trades situation, I suggest you re-tool yourself to appear more like a Swiss Army Knife: be clear in what each of your key skills is good for and demonstrate them with precision. Here’s what to do:

Step 1: Identify the top 5 skill sets you want to leverage in your next position. You have many skills, but you need to focus hiring managers on the skills you are most passionate about using on a daily basis so you can find a job that plays to your strengths.

Step 2: Map out how those skills support an employer in solving a problem. Clarify how will you use these skills specifically to save and/or make the company money. Ask yourself, “What pain will I alleviate when I utilize these skills for an employer?”

Step 3: Quantify your track record of success in these key skills. You need to be able to back up your abilities with facts. Articulate examples of how you have used each of these skills to help an employer so you can justify the cost of hiring you.

Step 4: Optimize your career tools (i.e. resume & LinkedIn profile), so they reflect your problem solving expertise using the skill sets you chose to showcase. Simplify these documents so the text clearly supports your area of focus. Less is more. Give hiring managers enough information to confirm you can do the specific job without overwhelming them. Your career tools should say, “I can do the job you need, but you’ll need to contact me to learn more.” (Here’s an article where I explain why your resume has only 6 seconds to get a recruiter’s attention.)

Finally, Don’t Forget To…

Once you’ve gone from branding yourself as a generalist to a specialist, you need to do one more thing: start a proactive job search. Just because you revamped your professional identity to be better suited for specific jobs, doesn’t mean employers will start responding to your online applications. If you really want to get an employer’s attention, you need to increase your networking efforts so you can spread the word about your special problem solving abilities as a way to get referred into positions. (This article maps out why your resume is useless without the right networking strategy.)

What other tips can readers share to deal with the Jack-of-all-trades challenge? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

P.S. – First time reading my posts? Thanks for taking the time to stop by! Not only do I write for Linkedin, but I’m also founder of the career advice site, CAREEREALISM, and currently run the career coaching program, CareerHMO. I hope you’ll check them both out!

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Top Job Bloggers’ Most Popular Articles of 2013

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Top Job Bloggers’ Most Popular Articles of 2013

Compelation by Stephen Darori and Stephen Drus

Heather Huhman Heather R. Huhman11 More Things They Don’t Tell You About Your First Internship
lavie margolin Lavie Margolin14 Do’s & Don’ts for LinkedIn “Skills & Expertise” profile category
Meg Guiseppi Meg GuiseppiSocial Proof: Where Online Presence Meets Personal Branding
dorleem avatar Dorlee MHow to Tame Your Job Interview Anxiety Once And For All !
Sital Ruparelia Sital Ruparelia5 Networking Myths
Alison Green Alison Greenwhen should salary be discussed in a hiring process? (part 2)
Gayle Howard Gayle HowardThe Traditional Cover Letter. Is it Outdated?
andy headworth Andy Headworth: So where are the 10 hottest job markets going to be in 2020?
Career Alley Joey Trebif: Top 6 Questions Asked for Embedded Engineers During an Interview
Julie Walraven Julie Walraven: Top 5 Major LinkedIn mistakes to avoid in 2013
Lindsey Pollak Lindsey Pollak: Millennials at Work: Gen Ys and Ambition
Suzanne Lucas Suzanne Lucas: Want Happier Employees? Feed Them
Karalyn Brown Karalyn Brown: 88 Great Behavioural Interview Questions To Help You Prepare For Your Next Interview!
Sharlyn Lauby Sharlyn Lauby: How To: Follow Up After a Job Interview
Dana Leavy-Detrick Dana Leavy-Detrick: How to Follow Up After the Interview or Application
alexandra levit Alexandra Levit: 8 Bad Mistakes New Managers Make
Jim Stroud Jim Stroud: This is why your resume was rejected
Rich DeMatteo Rich DeMatteo: 5 Things Recruiters Hate About Job Seekers
Dan Schawbel Dan Schawbel: Beware The ‘Tell Me About Yourself’ Job Interview Question!
jennifer mcclure Jennifer McClure: 10 Action Steps to Get the Most Out of LinkedIn [Beyond the Basics]
Andrew Rosen Andrew Rosen: 8 Best Employee Incentive Programs
anita bruzzese Anita Bruzzese: The No. 1 Reason Employers Can’t Find the Right Talent
Cindy Kraft Cindy Kraft: The 5 Worst Things You Can Do in Your Career
Jon Ingham Jon Ingham: Qinetiqette qits – can it be true?
Penelope  Trunk Penelope Trunk: The pursuit of happiness makes life shallow
Recruiting Animal Recruiting Animal: Revisiting Job Hunters – Jul 17, 2013
Eve Tahmincioglu Eve Tahmincioglu: Women, Work, War: A Guide to Toppling “The Company Man” Model
Hannah Morgan Hannah Morgan: 41 Reasons Why You Didn’t Get the Job
Jenny Foss Jenny Foss: Two different shoes don’t matter. Getting the important stuff right does.
Dan McCarthy Dan McCarthy: How to Confront an Employee Performance Problem
Erin Kennedy Erin Kennedy: Unemployed? You Have Secret Powers!
Phyllis Mufson Phyllis Mufson: Goal Setting: Part 2 of Your Personal/Professional Success Plan
Joshua Waldman Joshua Waldman: Part 1: Why You Should Use LinkedIn — Like Your Career Depends on It
Barbara Safani Barbara Safani: 10 Items That Should be Removed From Your Resume Pronto!
Mark Stelzner Mark Stelzner: The Power Of Seven Simple Questions
Jessica Merrell Jessica Merrell: 12 Best & Most Ridiculous Employer Brand & Recruiting Videos
Jason Alba Jason Alba: Never again say: “I lost my job.” Instead, say this:
Mark Babbitt Mark Babbitt: “Follow Your Passion” SUCKS as Career Advice
Susan Joyce Susan Joyce: After the Job Interview – Keep Searching and Keep Interviewing
Donna Sweidan Donna SweidanWhat Is Career Coaching And How Can It Help You?
Susan LaMotte Susan LaMotte5 Reasons Recruiting Is Like Dating
Grace Kutney Grace KutneyQuick Tips: Preparing for Skype or Phone Interviews
Miriam Salpeter Miriam SalpeterNetworking tips: how to expand your network
175 Helpful Questions To Ask At A Job Interview

 

 

Stephen Darori is the managing Partner of 3XC Global Partners. He is the Lead  Principal of Darori Capital Luxembourg. Stephen has been the Chairman of the Darori Foundation since 1982.

 

The Darori Foundation is the largest  donor of books to Israeli ( and also South African) University, College and Muncipal libraries and has consistently been so since 1969. The Darori Foundation , given the decreasing demand for hard copy books in the 21st Century Digital age , now leads and participates in Projects to put Internet Devices in Every Child in Israel. In 2013 , $5 million was earmarked to upgrade the notebooks used in schools in the Southern Periphery  Towns within 20 kms of Gaza . IBM (Corp)  quietly committed them selves to  matching finance ( in kind) . The new IBM notebooks are purchased at almost cost to IBM ( substantially discounted ) . Lets not start a turf war in Zion between IBM Israel ( franchised sales rep and IBM Corp )  . Keep the later sentence as confidentiality as possible. Over and above Notebooks and other Internet Devices , free ISP services  are provided and have been upgraded to a 100 Mega Down-link.

 

Stephen is also the founder of the Start Up Nation Critical Canvas. This is a  Socio Economical Political Lobby to change the employment Laws in Israel and open up the Job Market  to High Tech People who are not Jewish or Israeli. the pitch is simple . Israeli Academia can now longer keep pace with the Demand of the Start Up Nation’s White Silicon City ‘s Silicon Boulevard, the Golden Silicon City and the Silicon Wadi’s demand for High Tech Headcount. This is an extremely difficult Pitch to deliver as all decision makers wear two or more different Caps . The pitch says let them work in Zion, pay taxes , enjoy all the benefits of an Israeli Tax Payer but never Israeli Citizenship unless they marry an Israeli. The Tax System for individuals in Israel is structures around an Israeli ID Number. No ID number , no opportunity to work in Israel . Medical associations have a boutique solution for non-Israelis living in Zion who require medical treatment

Personal branding

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Personal branding is the practice of people marketing themselves and their careers as brands.[1] While previous self-helpmanagement techniques were about self-improvement, the personal-branding concept suggests instead that success comes from self-packaging.[1] Personal branding also involves creating an asset by defining an individual’s bodyclothingphysical appearance,digital and online presence and areas of knowledge in a way leading to a uniquely distinguishable, and ideally memorable, impression.[citation needed] The term is thought to have been first used and discussed in a 1997 article by Tom Peters.[2]

Personal Branding is esentially; the ongoing process of establishing a prescribed image or impression in the mind of others about an individual, group or organization.[3] Personal branding can often involves the application of one’s name to various products. For example, the celebrity real-estate mogul Donald Trump uses his last name extensively on his buildings and on the products he endorses (e.g. Trump Steaks).

History[edit]

Personal branding, self-positioning and all individual branding by whatever name, was first introduced in 1937 in the book Think and Grow Rich[citation needed] by Napoleon Hill. The idea surfaced later in the 1981 book Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind, by Al Riesand Jack Trout.[4] More specifically in “Chapter 23. Positioning Yourself and Your Career – You can benefit by using positioning strategy to advance your own career. Key principle: Don’t try to do everything yourself. Find a horse to ride”.

It was later popularized by Tom Peters.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up to:a b Lair, Daniel J.; Sullivan, Katie; Cheney, George (2005). “Marketization and the Recasting of the Professional Self”Management Communication Quarterly 18 (3): 307–343. doi:10.1177/0893318904270744.
  2. Jump up^ Asacker, Tom (10 March 2004). “The Seven Wonders of Branding”Forbes.com. Retrieved June 14, 2013.
  3. Jump up^ Creating Your Personal Brand – Los Ellis 2009
  4. Jump up^ Ries, Al; Trout, Jack (1981). Positioning: The Battle for your Mind. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07-135916-0.